Posted in adaptive/assistive devices

A free screen reader for the visually impaired

A stroke may either weaken vision or completely shut it off. And, those who are aged may have lower vision due to age. This is another barrier to improve communication of the stroke survivors as well as those already visually impaired. Because of this, they are unable to socialize with their friends, read news, learn or engage in compatible jobs. What if they have a method that it reads the computer screen? These are “screen…

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Posted in adaptive/assistive devices Best practices rehab communication

Cboard: A free app for speech impairments

This is great news for the caregivers of those with speech and language difficulties. This is how it works: do they need something to tell? such as I need water. they see the visual, click it, we hear it. The good thing is that we can customize it for our needs. Loads of pictures are available as pictograms. This is the link:https://www.cboard.io/. Enter the website; You will see the front page as shown below. Then,…

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Posted in adaptive/assistive devices

Create your own communication tool

Communication is one of the biggest barriers when dealing with an individual with a stroke. Some can understand very well but unable to express their needs and wants. That situation, obviously, not only the affected but their caregivers too make frustrating immensely. How can make this situation improve? I am introducing you to a relatively simple method that I come across: the use of iconic symbols. Iconic symbols Imagine that you want to know what…

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A fitted, raised toilet seat
Posted in adaptive/assistive devices rehab mobility

Toileting aids

Toileting aids for a person with a stroke is a must. Various devices exist to cater different needs of such a person depending on their ability to sit or stand. While some visit the wash room with assistance, others use aids on the bed. Following are the two useful toileting frames that are commonly in use out of a vast range of products. You all can add more to it under the comments section, or…

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rollator walker
Posted in adaptive/assistive devices rehab mobility

Walking aids: Rollators

Rollators are wheeled walkers; These can either be either three-wheeled or four-wheeled. It also has handles and brakes. And in some, a seat, a basket, and a tray too. This aid cannot be used by those who have a weakness over one side because both hands need to be used. Research has shown that these aid improves walking performance, reduces the risk of falling, promotes social interactions, and independent life.

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A four-legged (quad) cane
Posted in adaptive/assistive devices

Walking aids: Canes

A four-legged (quad) cane Canes or walking sticks are a very common walking aid used by those recovering from a stroke – not by all. Obviously, canes can give only support; that means the recovering individuals should be able to stand and walk with support. A physiotherapist should decide this. Research has shown that canes improve walking ability further. Not only that, it also boosts self-confidence and social interactions. Other than its use as a…

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