Posted in movement recovery

Best practices to regain walking ability after stroke

Basic rules As in the case of regaining arm and hand movements, the following six basic rules to recover movements after stroke apply to regain walking after stroke. This post looks at the evidence about how caregivers should apply the above rules in their efforts of regaining walking ability. Assess severity The journey begins with a severity assessment. A specially trained physiotherapist should assess and start physiotherapy according to the NICE guidelines1. Start early Starting to move as early as possible, between 24 – 48 hours2, after stroke yields better recovery of walking ability as in the case of all…

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Posted in bladder control

How to regain bladder control after stroke

Evidence exists that stroke carers can help stroke survivors regain bladder control after stroke. However, it seems that it is not in routine practice. Instead, Bladder leakage is managed with pads and catheters without treating the cause. Jo Booth, Professor of Rehabilitative Nursing at Glasgow Caledonian University.1 What stroke carers can do to help regain bladder control? Two methods to regain bladder control Train the bladder after stroke Do pelvic floor muscle exercises Who recommends those methods? In 2016, the Royal College of Physicians of their 2016 National Guidelines for Stroke2 recommend the above two methods to regain bladder control…

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Posted in movement recovery

How to regain lost movements after a stroke

Everyone wants to regain all movements lost due to a stroke; some of the lost ones recover without much effort after a month to two. But the rest needs coordinated effort within a “window of opportunity” for the best results. This post swims through the published hard work of researchers and expert recommendations about regaining movements after a stroke. Here you can find the evidence with the source under six rules. Those are, Rules to follow to regain movements after a stroke Move early Start an intense exercise program Do activities that are meaningful, engaging, task-specific Repeat the chosen activities…

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Posted in bladder control

How a stroke causes bladder problems

Stroke can result in either urinary incontinence or retention. It occurs as a result of the killing of neurons that are responsible in regulating the peeing.

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Posted in Communication after stroke

A free screen reader for the visually impaired

A stroke may either weaken vision or completely shut it off. And, those who are aged may have lower vision due to age. This is another barrier to improve communication of the stroke survivors as well as those already visually impaired. Because of this, they are unable to socialize with their friends, read news, learn or engage in compatible jobs. What if they have a method that it reads the computer screen? These are “screen readers”. These are available, but expensive. How about if you have it free? Yes, while I was searching for that kind of facility, I found…

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Posted in Uncategorized

What does stroke rehabilitation mean?

This post discusses the concept of stroke rehabilitation. This is where stroke carers have a big role to play. Here, we discuss when the stroke rehabilitation begins, what aspects it includes, and the current expert recommendations. What is stroke rehabilitation? It has three goals: Re-learning the lost skills Managing existing problems Preventing new problems When and how the stroke rehabilitation begins? The experts say it begins at the hospital as soon as the affected is medically stable. It could be as early as 48 hours of the event. The earliest rehab activity could be turning and moving arms and legs…

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Posted in Uncategorized

Detrimental effects of prolonged bed rest

Have you thought about this? About the detrimental effects of prolonged bed rest? This post is about that. A little bit of history about bed rest research Researchers say that bed rest was considered as a treatment strategy in the 19th century. This view was beginning to change at the turning to the 20th century. In 1947, Dr. R.A.J. Asher wrote an article to the British Medical Journal about “Dangers of going to bed”. His article was meant for physicians: ” we should think twice before ordering our patients to bed and realize that beneath the comfort of blanket there…

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Posted in stroke basics

Glial cells: Journeys to the brain-6

Glial cells with a neuron: Source: Open Stax.org RICE University under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license We know about neurons; do we know enough about Glial cells? In fact, glial cells outnumber neurons. And, they are very close allies of neurons. If they do not exist, neurons cannot exist. Types of glial cells There are three types of glial cells: Astrocytes, Microglia, and Oligodentrocytes. The diagram below illustrates them. Astrocytes As you can see, they look like stars and in contact with both neurons and the cells of the supply routes’ walls; in this case, the smallest branches of it –…

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Posted in Uncategorized

Blend cardio with muscle strengthening exercises

In your post-stroke recovery journey, experts say to blend cardio exercises with muscle strength exercises

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Posted in Uncategorized

World Stroke Organization on Stroke and Dementia

In June 2020, The Lancet Neurology published a very important Declaration proclaimed by the World Stroke Organization (WSO) on stroke and dementia. The WSO predicts that by 2050, about 200 million stroke survivors will be in the world. And because of the close link between stroke and dementia, we could expect about 106 million living with dementia; and, thereafter, each year, we may encounter over 30 million new stroke patients. The most notable statement, to me, in their declaration, is this: The current strategies to address risk factors for heart diseases and stroke are not sufficiently effective. World Stroke Organization,…

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