Posted in movement recovery

Games like card play help arm/hand stroke recovery

This is great news! Playing cards, dominos, bingo, Jenga, and ball games contribute to arm and hand recovery after a stroke in addition to your standard physio and occupational therapy program. There is another important finding here; its gains are similar to the gains from virtual reality games. In other words, if you live in low-resourced settings it does not really matter. Still, you can achieve similar improvement. It is also great news for those living in low-middle income countries. Read about: “Six rules to recover movements after stroke” About the study: The researchers1 included 141 aged 18-85 patients who…

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Posted in movement recovery

Exercise helps the brain to recover movements after stroke

Exercise helps the brain to recover movements after stroke. Here is how it happens! Exercise brings new neurons and new connections. This is exciting news; First, exercise stimulates neurons to release a special protein; the ” Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor” (in short, BDNF)1. This protein appears in blood only as a response to exercise. Keep in mind researchers have shown its presence as a response to aerobic exercise1; however, they believe resistance type of exercise too may also stimulate neurons to release this protein. What does this protein (BDNF) do? Second, this protein triggers a series of changes in multiple areas…

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Posted in movement recovery

Best practices to regain walking ability after stroke

Basic rules As in the case of regaining arm and hand movements, the following six basic rules to recover movements after stroke apply to regain walking after stroke. This post looks at the evidence about how caregivers should apply the above rules in their efforts of regaining walking ability. Assess severity The journey begins with a severity assessment. A specially trained physiotherapist should assess and start physiotherapy according to the NICE guidelines1. Start early Starting to move as early as possible, between 24 – 48 hours2, after stroke yields better recovery of walking ability as in the case of all…

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Posted in movement recovery

How to regain lost movements after a stroke

Everyone wants to regain all movements lost due to a stroke; some of the lost ones recover without much effort after a month to two. But the rest needs coordinated effort within a “window of opportunity” for the best results. This post swims through the published hard work of researchers and expert recommendations about regaining movements after a stroke. Here you can find the evidence with the source under six rules. Those are, Rules to follow to regain movements after a stroke Move early Start an intense exercise program Do activities that are meaningful, engaging, task-specific Repeat the chosen activities…

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Posted in Uncategorized

Research – practice gap on walking promotion

The 2015 published Cochrane review (1) found only five studies that evaluated community walking sessions for people living a stroke. And, they concluded that the quality of evidence of these studies was very low. Furthermore, only 266 individuals had been involved in all five studies and two of the programs “mimicked” community programs. Walking certainly improves walking ability and speed after a stroke event; the activity itself brings a multitude of benefits not only economically but socially also. I could not find any reviews published after 2015. Citations Barclay RE, Stevenson TJ, Poluha W, Ripat J, Nett C, Srikesavan CS….

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Posted in movement recovery

Mobility aids: Walking sticks

A four-legged (quad) walking stick Walking sticks or canes are a very common mobility aid used by those recovering from a stroke – not by all. Obviously, canes can give only support; that means the recovering individuals should be able to stand and walk with support. A physiotherapist should decide this. Research has shown that canes improve walking ability further. Not only that, but it also boosts self-confidence and social interactions. Other than its use as a walking aid, canes have several other practical applications such as using it as a tool to turn a switch on and off, reaching…

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