Posted in Communication after stroke

A free screen reader for the visually impaired

A stroke may either weaken vision or completely shut it off. And, those who are aged may have lower vision due to age. This is another barrier to improve communication of the stroke survivors as well as those already visually impaired. Because of this, they are unable to socialize with their friends, read news, learn or engage in compatible jobs. What if they have a method that it reads the computer screen? These are “screen readers”. These are available, but expensive. How about if you have it free? Yes, while I was searching for that kind of facility, I found…

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Posted in Communication after stroke

Cboard: A free app for speech impairments

This is great news for the caregivers of those with speech and language difficulties. This is how it works: do they need something to tell? such as I need water. they see the visual, click it, we hear it. The good thing is that we can customize it for our needs. Loads of pictures are available as pictograms. This is the link:https://www.cboard.io/. Enter the website; You will see the front page as shown below. Then, start your Cboard. Then, sign up. Then, you will receive an email for confirmation. unlock it. now, you can build a board. Once you registered…

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Posted in Communication after stroke

Create your own communication tool

Communication is one of the biggest barriers when dealing with an individual with a stroke. Some can understand very well but unable to express their needs and wants. That situation, obviously, not only the affected but their caregivers too make frustrating immensely. How can make this situation improve? I am introducing you to a relatively simple method that I come across: the use of iconic symbols. Iconic symbols Imagine that you want to know what your loved one wants to eat now. Still, you know what their preferences are. When you prepare their most liked food items, you can picture…

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Posted in Communication after stroke stroke basics

Wernicke aphasia: “Fluent aphasia”

aphasia

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Posted in Communication after stroke stroke basics

Broca aphasia: “Non-fluent aphasia”

This journey (Journeys to the brain -12) travels again to the Broca area to explore Broca aphasia. You can read about the Broca area in the Broca area: Journeys to the brain-11 How a stroke causes the Broca aphasia A full-blown stroke blocks the brain’s blood supply. When it happens inside the anterior branch of the middle cerebral artery, the brain cells in the Broca area deprive of oxygen and nutrients. As a result, they begin to die each passing second at a rate of about 32,000 neurons per second!. The final result is this particular speech problem. What do really hapens…

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Posted in Communication after stroke stroke basics

Broca’s area: Journeys to the Brain-11

Paul Broca: Source: Wellcome Collection under the license of CC BY 4.0 Broca’s area plays a very important role in our speech. Prior to 1861, scientists debated whether the whole brain acted either as a single entity or contains specific regions. Pierre Paul Broca ended this debate in 1861. “Monsieur Tan” Prior to 1861, Pierre Paul Broca examined an adult male – Leborgne – who came with a right-sided paralysis. Pierre Paul Broca was a surgeon who had a special interest in physical anthropology. He had been studying the association between skull shapes and sizes with evolution. In addition to the…

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