Posted in stroke basics

Neurons

An illustrated neuron graphic

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Posted in stroke basics

Neuron forest: Journeys to the brain-4

“Neuron” by NIH-NCATS is licensed under CC BY 2.0 Our brain contains about 100 billion neurons; it looks like a neuron forest. because a neuron is more or less similar to a tree. Neurons are a special kind of cell. At one end, it sprouts a large number of very thin short threads – “dendrites”. The ends of these receive electrical signals from other neurons via small fluid-filled ponds – “synapses”. The received signals pass along until it reaches the tree (cell) body. From there, it shoots away to the next neuron through another a thicker branch; it is named “Axon”. So, dendrites take…

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Posted in movement recovery after stroke stroke basics

“Two little humanoids” (Homunculus) on the brain surface

“The little humanoid”: image source: Wikimedia Commons  This journey travels through “two little humanoids” who “live” on the brain surface. Dr Wilder Penfield and Edwin Boldrey “discovered” them in 1937. This is an amazing story. In 1937, while working at McGill University, Dr Wilder Penfield and Edwin Boldrey began mapping brain regions that receive sensory information from corresponding skin areas. Not only that, they mapped brain regions that send signals to move corresponding body parts. This laborious exercise became possible because they were operating under local anaesthesia at that time. Together with Edwin Boldrey, the surgeon published their story in…

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